Film Commissioner: Hoffman was true WNYer

This photo taken Jan. 19, 2014, shows Phillip Seymour Hoffman posing for a portrait at The Collective and Gibson Lounge Powered by CEG, during the Sundance Film Festival, in Park City, Utah. Hoffman, who won the Oscar for best actor in 2006 for his portrayal of writer Truman Capote in "Capote", was found dead Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014, in his New York apartment. He was 46. (Photo by Victoria Will/Invision/AP)
This photo taken Jan. 19, 2014, shows Phillip Seymour Hoffman posing for a portrait at The Collective and Gibson Lounge Powered by CEG, during the Sundance Film Festival, in Park City, Utah. Hoffman, who won the Oscar for best actor in 2006 for his portrayal of writer Truman Capote in "Capote", was found dead Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014, in his New York apartment. He was 46. (Photo by Victoria Will/Invision/AP)

Actor Philip Seymor Hoffman was found dead Sunday. The Oscar Winner was found dead in his apartment. The news has shocked Hollywood, but it’s also affecting people closer to home.

Buffalo Niagara Film Commissioner Tim Clark says Hoffman was a true western New Yorker. He grew up near Rochester and spent some time here shooting a movie.

Sources say he died on an apparent drug overdose and found with a needle in his arm. Hoffman had been open about his struggles with drugs, telling CBS’s Steve Kroft that he stopped using at age 22 because he panicked.

In recent years Hoffman starred in the film Capote, his starring role earned him the “best actor” Oscar. Around that same time, Hoffman did some work here in western New York on another film called The Savages.

Clark says Hoffman felt right at home when he came to Buffalo. Last month Clark ran into the actor and said he seemed like he was in good spirits.

Hoffman’s family says his death was a “tragic and sudden loss.” They asked people to respect their privacy.

Hoffman leaves behind his partner  of 15 year Mimi O’Donnell and their three children. He was just 46 years old.

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