Teacher shares lesson on power of social media

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, social media is nothing new, but its reach gets wider every day. That’s something young students may not understand yet.

Gaskill Prep Teacher Kris Green said, “I don’t think they realize how others view them once they see some of those things. I don’t even think they realize that others can see it that they’re not friends with directly on Facebook but people are seeing it and I see it.”

Green doesn’t want his students to learn the hard way how our social media lives can affect us in real life. So he set up a special Facebook project.

Nieyaae Davis is in seventh grade at Gaskill Prepatory School in Niagara Falls. Davis said, “I was like arguing with my brother on Facebook and I was like cussing at him.”

Kris Green is her teacher, and started a project to teach his students about what being careless with social media can do.

Green asked his class, “How many of you have social media like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram?”

Green continued, “Well those things are permanent, and sometimes as kids we think that if our Facebook page or Twitter page is private, that other people won’t be able to see it and that’s just not true.”

Green posted a picture to his Facebook page, to watch the likes and shares add up. He allowed News 4’s cameras into his classroom to follow the project. The idea was that his friends would share the picture, and then their friends, and their friends’ friends, so students can see how quickly one post can be seen by people far and wide. In the first few days of the project, his photo got more than 1,000 likes on Facebook. At the end of the project, we will hear how many likes the photo received and

Gaskill student Immanuel Badger said, “Some people like they take pictures about everything they do what they eat, what they’re wearing everything.”

Another student Skyler White said, “Mom and Dad and I think that its basically a site for predators and you can get your account be hacked.”

Gaskill student Rianna Baxter said, “The wrong way is like talking to strangers that they don’t know and sharing their information with them.”

Green hopes that his students won’t have to deal with more serious consequences.

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