Great Lakes levels expected to be higher than average into fall

A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo Regulatory Team provided permit guidance to residents in Youngstown, New York. A bank as seen in the photo collapsed due to high Lake Ontario water levels. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

BUFFALO, N.Y. (WIVB) – Great Lakes water levels are expected to be higher than both average and last year’s levels throughout the summer and into the fall, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District announced Monday.

Above average precipitation on the lakes and wet conditions in the months of April and May pushed lake levels higher than originally forecasted, Keith Kompoltowicz, chief of Watershed Hydrology at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District said.

The forecasted summer water levels on Lake Erie will be at their highest since 1996-1998.

Lake Ontario has already set a new record high monthly mean water level in May. At 248.69 feet, May’s level was the highest monthly mean for any month in the 1918-2016 period of record. The previous record high of 248.56 feet occurred in June 1952.

Near record high levels on Lake Ontario are expected to persist in June, before water levels should begin their seasonal decline, a statement from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers stated.

 

 

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