Tropical Storm Nate threatens to hit U.S. Gulf Coast

A map from the National Hurricane Center shows the probable path of Tropical Storm Nate as of 2 p.m. ET on Oct. 5, 2017. D stands for tropical depression. S stands for tropical storm. H stands for hurricane. The blue lines represent areas under tropical storm warnings. NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

MANAGUA, Nicaragua — Tropical Storm Nate was blamed Thursday for at least 22 deaths across Central America as it dumped rain across the region on a path that would carry it toward a potential landfall on the U.S. Gulf Coast as a hurricane over the weekend.

Louisiana officials ordered some people there to evacuate.

The center of the storm moved over eastern Honduras, the National Hurricane Center said Thursday. The storm could dump as much as 20 inches of rain by Saturday in southern Honduras and western Nicaragua, the National Hurricane Center said. Flash floods and mudslides are both possible.

It had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph at midday Thursday and was likely to strengthen over the northwestern Caribbean Sea Thursday night and Friday before a possible strike on the Cancun region at the tip of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula.

Tropical Storm Nate as it moved over Honduras on Oct. 5, 2017. NOAA

 

The forecast track showed the storm could brush across the tip of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula late Friday night and then hit the U.S. Gulf Coast as a hurricane by Sunday morning. Forecasters said hurricane conditions were possible in Mexico Friday night.

In Nicaragua, Nate’s arrival followed two weeks of near-constant rain that had left the ground saturated and rivers swollen. Authorities placed the whole country on alert and warned of flooding and landslides.

Nicaragua’s vice president and spokeswoman, Rosario Murillo, said that at least 15 people had died in that country due to the storm. She didn’t give details on all the deaths, but said two women and a man who worked for the Health Ministry were swept away by a flooded canal in the central municipality of Juigalpa.

A map from the National Hurricane Center shows the probable path of Tropical Storm Nate as of 2 p.m. ET on Oct. 5, 2017. D stands for tropical depression. S stands for tropical storm. H stands for hurricane. The blue lines represent areas under tropical storm warnings. NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

The government closed schools nationwide.

Costa Rica’s Judicial Investigation Organism blamed seven deaths in that country on the storm and said 15 people were missing. Flooding drove 5,000 residents into emergency shelters.

In Louisiana, officials ordered the evacuation of part of coastal St. Bernard Parish east of New Orleans ahead of the storm. Earlier Thursday, a voluntary evacuation was called in the barrier island town of Grand Isle south of New Orleans.

New Orleans officials outlined steps to bolster the city’s pump and drainage system. Weaknesses in that system were revealed during summer flash floods.

In the Pacific, former Tropical Storm Ramon dissipated off the southwestern coast of Mexico.

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