Trump signs budget deal, government to reopen

FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, file photo, the sky over The Capitol is lit up at dawn as Senate Republicans work to pass their sweeping tax bill this week in Washington, (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Friday signed a $400 billion budget deal that sharply boosts spending and swells the federal deficit, ending a brief federal government shutdown that happened while most Americans were home in bed and most government offices were closed, anyway.

The House and Senate approved a bill to keep the government funded through March 23, overcoming opposition from liberal Democrats as well as tea party conservatives to endorse enormous spending increases despite looming trillion-dollar deficits. The House voted 240-186 to approve the bill just before dawn Eastern time, hours after the Senate had approved the measure on a 71-28 vote.

Trump tweeted Friday morning that he had signed the bill, writing that the U.S. military “will now be stronger than ever before.” The budget bill “also means JOBS, JOBS, JOBS!” Trump tweeted.

The twin votes put to rest a brief federal freeze that relatively few would notice. Many who did quickly labeled it a pointless, head-scratching episode. The shutdown was the second partial government shutdown in three weeks.

The breakdown came largely in the Senate, when after a day of inaction, Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky went rogue and stalled a vote in protest over his party’s willingness to bust the budget. But Democrats also had their divisions and wrangling, largely with liberal upset the measure were not tied to any plans to assist the “Dreamer” immigrants.

Most Democrats opposed the measure, following the lead of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who tried and failed to use the moment to secure a promise for a separate vote on immigration. Up to the final minutes, it was not clear the bill would pass and many Democrats held their votes, allowing the tally to creep slowly and giving no indication which way it might fall.

House Speaker Paul Ryan urged Congress to avoid a “second needless shutdown in a matter of weeks — entirely needless.”

There was far less drama in the Senate, where the measure sailed through by a 71-28 tally once Paul’s protest ran its course.

The White House was forced to order the government shutdown shortly after midnight, but leaders quickly hustled to move before federal employees were due back at work, hoping to minimize the disruption.

The White House kept its distance from the quarreling on Capitol Hill. Trump did not tweet on the issue Thursday and aides did not try to assign blame.

Senate GOP leaders, however, were clearly irked by the debacle. In his attempt to sway Paul to relent, Texas Sen. John Cornyn declared his fellow Republican was “wasting everyone’s time” and prompting a shutdown for “no good reason.” But Paul, the resident contrarian, repelled suggestions to stand aside.

“I didn’t come up here to be part of somebody’s club. I didn’t come up here to be liked,” Paul said.

The budget agreement is married to a six-week temporary funding bill needed to keep the government operating and to provide time to implement the budget pact.

The bill includes huge spending increases sought by Republicans for the Pentagon along with a big boost demanded by Democrats for domestic agencies. Both sides pressed for $89 billion for disaster relief, extending a host of health care provisions, and extending a slew of smaller tax breaks.

It also would increase the government’s debt cap, preventing a first-ever default on U.S. obligations that looms in just a few weeks. Such debt limit votes are usually enormous headaches for GOP leaders, but the increase means another vote won’t occur before March 2019.

Senate leaders had celebrated the budget deal as a sign they had left behind some of their chronic dysfunction. Just three weeks ago, Senate Democrats sparked a three-day partial government shutdown by staging a filibuster on a spending bill, seeking relief for “Dreamer” immigrants who’ve lived in the country illegally since they were children.

Senate Democrats had no appetite for another shutdown.

House GOP leaders shored up support among conservatives for the measure, which would shower the Pentagon with money but add hundreds of billions of dollars to the nation’s $20 trillion-plus debt.

House Democratic leaders opposed the measure — arguing it should resolve the plight of Dreamers — but not with all their might. Pelosi made it plain she wasn’t pressuring her colleagues to kill the bill, which is packed with money for party priorities like infrastructure, combating opioid abuse and helping college students.

“She negotiated the deal. Her team was in on it,” said top GOP vote counter Patrick McHenry, R-N.C. “And they were a ‘no.’ And at the end her team broke.”

Pelosi continued to press Ryan for a promise to bring an immigration measure sponsored by Reps. Will Hurd, R-Texas, and Pete Aguilar, D-Calif., up for a vote. But many Democrats backed the spending measure without that assurance.

Ryan said again Thursday he was determined to bring an immigration bill to the floor this year — albeit only one that has Trump’s blessing.

“We will solve this DACA problem,” Ryan said just before the vote. “Once we get this budget agreement done … we will focus on bringing that debate to this floor and finding a solution.”

The episode was a clear defeat for Democrats who had followed a risky strategy to use the party’s leverage on the budget to address immigration. Protection for the Dreamers under former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, formally expires March 5 and there’s no sign that lawmakers are making progress on an agreement to extend the program.

Republicans, too, had their disappointments. Many were sheepish or even angry about the bushels of dollars for Democratic priorities and the return next year of $1 trillion-plus deficits. But they pointed to money they have long sought for the Pentagon, which they say needs huge sums for readiness, training and weapons modernization.

“It provides what the Pentagon needs to restore our military’s edge for years to come,” said Ryan.

Beyond $300 billion worth of increases for the military and domestic programs, the agreement adds $89 billion in overdue disaster aid for hurricane-slammed Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico, a politically charged increase in the government’s borrowing cap and a grab bag of health and tax provisions. There’s also $16 billion to renew a slew of expired tax breaks that Congress seems unable to kill.

“I love bipartisanship, as you know,” said Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz. “But the problem is the only time we discover bipartisanship is when we spend more money.”

Here is a breakdown of the votes:

AYES NOES PRES NV
REPUBLICAN 167 67 4
DEMOCRATIC 73 119 1
INDEPENDENT
TOTALS 240 186   5

 

—- AYES    240 —

 

Abraham
Aderholt
Allen
Amodei
Arrington
Babin
Bacon
Banks (IN)
Barletta
Barr
Beatty
Bera
Bergman
Bilirakis
Bishop (GA)
Bishop (MI)
Bishop (UT)
Blackburn
Blunt Rochester
Bost
Brady (TX)
Brooks (IN)
Buchanan
Bucshon
Burgess
Bustos
Butterfield
Byrne
Calvert
Carbajal
Carter (GA)
Carter (TX)
Cartwright
Castor (FL)
Cheney
Coffman
Cohen
Cole
Collins (GA)
Collins (NY)
Comstock
Conaway
Connolly
Cook
Costa
Costello (PA)
Courtney
Cramer
Crawford
Crist
Cuellar
Culberson
Curbelo (FL)
Davis, Rodney
DeLauro
DelBene
Denham
Dent
DeSantis
DesJarlais
Deutch
Diaz-Balart
Donovan
Doyle, Michael F.
Duffy
Dunn
Estes (KS)
Esty (CT)
Evans
Farenthold
Faso
Ferguson
Fitzpatrick
Fleischmann
Flores
Fortenberry
Frelinghuysen
Fudge
Gallagher
Garamendi
Gibbs
Gonzalez (TX)
Goodlatte
Gottheimer
Gowdy
Granger
Graves (GA)
Graves (MO)
Green, Al
Green, Gene
Grothman
Guthrie
Hanabusa
Handel
Harper
Hartzler
Heck
Higgins (LA)
Higgins (NY)
Hill
Himes
Huffman
Huizenga
Hultgren
Hunter
Hurd
Issa
Jackson Lee
Jenkins (KS)
Jenkins (WV)
Johnson (OH)
Johnson, E. B.
Johnson, Sam
Joyce (OH)
Kaptur
Katko
Keating
Kelly (MS)
Kelly (PA)
Kilmer
King (NY)
Kinzinger
Knight
Kuster (NH)
Kustoff (TN)
LaHood
LaMalfa
Lamborn
Lance
Langevin
Larsen (WA)
Larson (CT)
Latta
Lawrence
Lawson (FL)
LoBiondo
Loebsack
Loudermilk
Love
Lucas
Luetkemeyer
Lynch
MacArthur
Marchant
Marino
Marshall
Mast
McCarthy
McCaul
McCollum
McHenry
McKinley
McMorris Rodgers
McNerney
McSally
Meehan
Messer
Mitchell
Moolenaar
Mullin
Murphy (FL)
Nolan
Nunes
O’Halleran
O’Rourke
Olson
Palazzo
Pascrell
Paulsen
Pittenger
Poe (TX)
Poliquin
Reichert
Rice (NY)
Roby
Roe (TN)
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rooney, Francis
Rooney, Thomas J.
Rosen
Roskam
Ross
Royce (CA)
Ruiz
Ruppersberger
Russell
Rutherford
Ryan (OH)
Ryan (WI)
Scalise
Schneider
Scott (VA)
Scott, Austin
Scott, David
Sessions
Sewell (AL)
Shea-Porter
Shimkus
Shuster
Simpson
Sinema
Slaughter
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Soto
Stefanik
Stewart
Stivers
Taylor
Tenney
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Thompson (PA)
Thornberry
Tipton
Tonko
Trott
Tsongas
Turner
Upton
Valadao
Vela
Visclosky
Wagner
Walberg
Walden
Walorski
Walters, Mimi
Weber (TX)
Welch
Wenstrup
Williams
Wilson (SC)
Wittman
Womack
Woodall
Yarmuth
Young (AK)
Young (IA)

 

—- NOES    186 —

 

Adams
Aguilar
Amash
Barragán
Barton
Bass
Beyer
Biggs
Blumenauer
Bonamici
Boyle, Brendan F.
Brady (PA)
Brat
Brooks (AL)
Brown (MD)
Brownley (CA)
Buck
Budd
Capuano
Cárdenas
Carson (IN)
Castro (TX)
Chabot
Chu, Judy
Cicilline
Clark (MA)
Clarke (NY)
Clay
Cleaver
Clyburn
Comer
Cooper
Correa
Crowley
Curtis
Davidson
Davis (CA)
Davis, Danny
DeFazio
DeGette
Delaney
Demings
DeSaulnier
Dingell
Doggett
Duncan (SC)
Duncan (TN)
Ellison
Emmer
Engel
Eshoo
Espaillat
Foster
Foxx
Frankel (FL)
Gabbard
Gaetz
Gallego
Garrett
Gianforte
Gohmert
Gomez
Gosar
Graves (LA)
Griffith
Grijalva
Gutiérrez
Harris
Hastings
Hensarling
Herrera Beutler
Hice, Jody B.
Holding
Hollingsworth
Hoyer
Hudson
Jayapal
Jeffries
Johnson (GA)
Johnson (LA)
Jordan
Kelly (IL)
Kennedy
Khanna
Kihuen
Kildee
Kind
King (IA)
Krishnamoorthi
Labrador
Lee
Levin
Lewis (GA)
Lewis (MN)
Lieu, Ted
Lipinski
Lofgren
Long
Lowenthal
Lowey
Lujan Grisham, M.
Luján, Ben Ray
Maloney, Carolyn B.
Maloney, Sean
Massie
Matsui
McClintock
McEachin
McGovern
Meadows
Meeks
Meng
Mooney (WV)
Moore
Moulton
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal
Newhouse
Noem
Norcross
Norman
Pallone
Palmer
Panetta
Payne
Pearce
Pelosi
Perlmutter
Perry
Peters
Peterson
Pingree
Pocan
Polis
Posey
Price (NC)
Quigley
Raskin
Ratcliffe
Reed
Renacci
Rice (SC)
Richmond
Rohrabacher
Rokita
Ros-Lehtinen
Rothfus
Rouzer
Roybal-Allard
Rush
Sánchez
Sanford
Sarbanes
Schakowsky
Schiff
Schrader
Schweikert
Sensenbrenner
Serrano
Sherman
Sires
Smith (MO)
Smith (NE)
Smith (WA)
Smucker
Speier
Suozzi
Swalwell (CA)
Takano
Titus
Torres
Vargas
Veasey
Velázquez
Walker
Walz
Wasserman Schultz
Waters, Maxine
Watson Coleman
Webster (FL)
Westerman
Wilson (FL)
Yoder
Yoho
Zeldin

 

—- NOT VOTING    5 —

 

Black
Blum
Bridenstine
Cummings
Jones

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